Howard University has been named the top private institution to graduate Pell Grant students on the new @USNews social mobility list. #BestColleges Social mobility deals with the movement of individuals or groups up or down from one socio-economic level to another, often by changing jobs or marriage. Howard University contributing to the legacy for those traditionally categorized as minorities is simply, in many ways, making the impossible possible.

The ability or opportunity to receive or rather purchase the tool of education is a deficit in many communities. For years it has been indirectly protected that the opportunity to go to college is a gift, almost a privilege. However, it is now becoming a necessity. This, education, is something we cannot afford to not have and something many can’t afford to have. Could we be indirectly saying; “you can put me in chains again, just let me sign this MPN first”?  

As should be obvious the Lord’s answer was “yes”. The response by many in the Christian community presents a shocking reality, one that personally saddens me. As we have crucified the seemingly widely beloved pastor John Gray and others we have indirectly suggested that engaging in conversation (meaningful and with reformative motives) is something that is synonymous with compromise and this, quite frankly, is a false view. 

West claims that he is looking to start a dialogue, delivering a succession of tweets to his nearly 30 million followers, it’s seems that he is doing just that; sparking dialogue and provoking thought among colleagues and constituents alike. This is ever a developing story. For we are in the midst of a political revolution in which political correctness and brash, close-minded conservatism is colliding.

Attending Howard University, for me, was a choice of destiny and that alone. HBCUs, Howard University, specifically celebrate blackness and all that it entails. No institution is perfect, though this does not excuse the actions of the recent Howard scandal, this still should be understood. The impact of HBCUs extends beyond the black community.