DANIEL CAMERON: A law hero in the Breonna Taylor case

Kentucky lawyer and attorney general, Daniel Cameron, faced what could possibly be the toughest moment yet in his political career.

This bold behavior comes at a time when Americans have watched many public officials avoid their responsibilities to uphold the law without bias. Kentucky’s 34-year-old attorney general appears to be an exception to the dysfunctional rules of “mob justice”, per the Wall Street Journal.

Do we really want the truth? Or do we want a truth that fits our narrative? Do we want the facts? Are we content to blindly accept our own version of events? We, as a community, must make this decision.

Daniel Cameron (Kentucky Attorney General)

Wednesday Cameron patiently explained on national TV that his allegiance was to the law, not to his race or to emotions or to public sentiment (no matter how violent or threatening it may be) in the legal decisions surrounding the Breonna Taylor investigation. An emphasis on in his message was the fact that every tragic wrong does not necessarily find a cure in the criminal code. In other words, the law matters and does not change at the impulse of outrageous or popular opinion(s).

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron addresses the media following the return of a grand jury investigation into the death of Breonna Taylor, in Frankfort, Ky., Sept. 23.
PHOTO: TIMOTHY D. EASLEY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Reports from the Washington Post detail Cameron’s confidence and bedrock belief in the virtue of the law.

Cameron, who is slowly becoming a Black republican star won his first bid for office last year by beating a conservative state senator in the Republican primary and then defeating his Democratic opponent being the first republican elected to the attorney general post in Kentucky in 70 years.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron (R) spoke about the grand jury’s investigation into the death of Breonna Taylor. (WLKY News Louisville)

Notably Cameron recently slammed Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden as someone who believes that there is no diversity of thought in the Black community, who says that any Black who doesn’t support him “ain’t Black.”

Cameron explained why Taylor’s death was not a murder, why the two officers who shot her were justified in using deadly force, why the law prevented him from deciding on his own whether the officers ought to be charged in her death.

“Look at me, I am Black,” Cameron said during the 2020 Republican National Convention. “We are not all the same, sir. I am not in chains. My mind is my own.”

On Wednesday, Cameron left that kind of rhetoric behind.

He approached this sensitive case, as described by the Washington Post, masked against coronavirus, and then, in a soft, serious tone, he ensured that he presented himself as a neutral, deliberate arbiter (as all lawyers and legal counsel should).

As Cameron said, “the criminal law is not meant to respond to every sorrow and grief” going on to say “criminal justice isn’t the quest for revenge…I certainly understand the pain that has been brought about by the tragic death of Breonna Taylor,” he said. “I understand that as a Black man.” But “if we simply act on emotion or outrage, there is no justice,” Cameron added. “Justice is not easy. It does not fit the mold of public opinion.”

Cameron explained why Taylor’s death was not a murder, why the two officers who shot her were justified in using deadly force, why the law prevented him from deciding on his own whether the officers ought to be charged in her death.

He was calm, knowledgeable, in command of the truth— exactly what some [Kentucky] Democrats fear might garner him massive political support in the coming years.

Cameron has become the current target of Democratic disdain and liberal wrath — this is expressly shown in the racist and hateful comments made about him and as of Wednesday afternoon, his Wikipedia biography described him as “the first Uncle Tom elected” to his office.

Despite the negative backlash and hate from liberal media, activists, and anarchists Cameron’s handling of this difficult task is a much needed reassurance to every American who is concerned about police who may use excessive force (regardless of “race”), but also it consoles those concerned about the riots and killing of law enforcement following some of police shootings politicized through woke performative “justice”.

Why this matters: Will the facts actually matter? We now know and as AG Cameron noted witness testimony indicated officers appeared to correctly execute a search warrant on Taylor’s apartment in connection to a drug case that the two other officers involved in a shootout with Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were justified in their use of force because Walker fired first.

“The Louisville police officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s shooting death ‘knocked and announced’ themselves — and did not execute a ‘no-knock warrant’ as previously believed, Kentucky’s attorney general said Wednesday,” per the New York Post

At a press conference, Cameron said a neighbor corroborated cops’ claims that they knocked on Taylor’s apartment door and announced themselves as police in the early hours of March 13.”

Former Lousiville police officer Brett Hankison was indicted on three counts of “wanton endangerment in the first degree” for firing his service weapon “blindly through a door and window in Taylor’s building,” according to CNN.

“The decision before my office is not to decide if the loss of Breonna Taylor’s life was a tragedy,” Cameron said. “The answer to that question is unequivocally yes.”

He added that the case was “gut-wrenching” and that he ensured there be a lengthy grand jury investigation so that his office could “get this right.”

“I certainly understand the pain that has been brought about by the tragic loss of Ms. Taylor,” he said. “I understand that as an attorney general who is responsible for all 120 counties, in terms of being the chief legal officer — the chief law enforcement officer, I understand that. I understand that as a Black man — how painful this is, which is why it was so incredibly important to make sure that we did everything we possibly could to uncover every fact.”

The core of Cameron’s heroic behavior is his stand for facts and truth in a world that typical prefers preselected narratives that often tend to be false.

“We must also remember the facts and the collection of evidence in this case are different than cases elsewhere in the country. Each is unique and cannot be compared”, Cameron proclaimed.

“Our reaction to the truth is the society we want to be,” Cameron continued. “Do we really want the truth? Or do we want a truth that fits our narrative? Do we want the facts? Are we content to blindly accept our own version of events? We, as a community, must make this decision.”

“There will be celebrities, influencers, and activists who having never lived in Kentucky, will try to tell us how to feel, suggesting they understood the facts of this case and that they know our community and the commonwealth better than we do,” he concluded. “They don’t.”

They don’t.

Much of the violence, many of the riots, and the disinformation comes from “they”; elites who may feel a need to engage in moral platitudes without any regard for truth or undeniable facts.

Understanding, as AG Cameron said, “The proof is now before us. The facts have been examined, and the grand jury, comprised of our peers and fellow residents, have made a decision.”

Will those (they) who don’t understand law, procedure, and the need for facts and truth accept this decision?

Many who truly want justice, peace, and equality will and those who are only interested in pushing unproven and often refuted narratives will not.

We learn here that, in the end, the facts matter and truth wins.

AG Daniel Cameron is the unsung hero in this Breonna Taylor saga as he has preserved both the image and substance of law and order, at least in Kentucky, against the taunt and threat of mob rule, fake outrage, and performative justice.