Ruth Bader Ginsburg: US Supreme Court judge dies of cancer, aged 87, (the politics of it all)

US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a pop culture icon, died Friday of cancer at the age of 87.

Ginsburg died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at her home in Washington, DC, surrounded by her family, a statement released by the court said.

Earlier this year, Ginsburg said she was undergoing chemotherapy for a recurrence of cancer.

A prominent feminist, she became a figurehead for liberals in the US.

Ginsburg was the oldest justice and the second ever woman to sit on the Supreme Court, where she served for 27 years.

“Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature,” Chief Justice John Roberts said in a statement on Friday. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her – a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg prompted key Washington figures to change their tune on whether a high-court vacancy should be filled so close to an election – and even the late jurist seems to have reversed herself on the issue.

Ginsburg, whose death was announced Friday, reportedly told her granddaughter Clara Spera, “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.” That desire jibes with Democrats, including presidential nominee Joe Biden and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, whose initial statements included both tributes to Ginsburg and warnings to President Trump that the next nominee could only be named by the winner of the November presidential election.

But in 2016, when a lame-duck President Obama tabbed Merrick Garland to replace the late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, Democratic leaders had no problem with the move. And neither did Ginsburg.

“There’s nothing in the Constitution that says the president stops being the president in his last year,” Ginsburg said in a 2016 New York Times interview in which she called for Garland to receive a confirmation vote in the Senate.

The bottom line: Politics is the name of the game, sadly, even in death. One can clearly see this as both republicans and democrats have resorted by and large to party line positions.